Complete publication list

Shown below is a complete list of my work, which has appeared in Astronomy, Discover, Drone360, New Scientist, Physics World, Popular Science, Quanta Magazine, Smithsonian.com, and Symmetry Magazine, in addition to my two children's books from ABDO Publishing and one from Lerner.
 

Astronomy (features)

Close encounters with the ringed planet (October 2017)
The cosmic bullies next door (July 2017)
Supernova 1987A: 30 years later (March 2017)
Galaxy clusters: The universe's cosmic lenses (February 2017)
Top 10 space stories of 2016 (January 2017, cover story)
I'll have a Cosmo (December 2016)
The hunt for stars' hidden fingerprints (October 2016)
What's blowing bubbles in the Milky Way? (May 2016)
Top 10 space stories of 2015 (January 2016, cover story)
Limits of the cosmos: The far reaches of space (December 2015)
What lurks in the monstrous heart of the Milky Way? (October 2015)
Searching for the universe's background glow (August 2015, cover story)
How Hubble changed the world (April 2015)
Top 10 space stories of 2014 (January 2015, cover story)
Exoplanet systems illustrated (December 2014)
Has NASA lost its edge? (September 2014)
Chandra’s 10 biggest discoveries (July 2014)
Hunting aurorae in the Arctic (July 2014)
Chasing the Moon’s shadow through Africa (June 2014)
The next search for Earth-like worlds (April 2014)
Guide to galaxies (2014 Cosmic Origins digital app)
Guide to stars (2014 Cosmic Origins digital app)
Guide to planets (2014 Cosmic Origins digital app)
Top 10 space stories of 2013 (January 2014, cover story)
How Planck has redefined the universe (October 2013)
Secrets of the brightest objects in the universe (July 2013, cover story)
Why the universe has no center (May 2013)
How astronomers know the universe’s age (March 2013)
Top 10 space stories of 2012 (January 2013, cover story)
When Earth felt cosmic rain (November 2012)
Inside the world’s most powerful machine (June 2012)
How we know black holes exist (April 2012, cover story)
Probing Einstein’s relativity (March 2012, cover story)
Top 10 space stories of 2011 (January 2012, cover story)
How Antarctica unlocks cosmic secrets (October 2011)
Fixing the twinkle of stars (July 2011)
What happens when stars die? (June 2011)
Captured moons of the giant planets (February 2011)
How stars form (December 2010 cover story, and republished in 2014 Cosmic Origins digital app)
How sky surveys will revolutionize astronomy (July 2010)
What makes stars tick? (June 2010)
Top 10 stories of 2009 (February 2010, cover story)
What do we really know about dark matter? (November 2009, cover story)
How we mapped the Milky Way (October 2009, cover story)
Light’s dual personality (July 2009)
The telescope’s 400-year revolution (May 2009, and republished in 2012 special issue)
Will dark energy tear the universe apart? (February 2009, cover story)
5 mind-bending cosmology questions untangled (May 2007 cover story, and republished in 2009 special issue)
18 must-read books for cloudy nights (December 2006)

 

Discover

Magazine:

Missing Matter Found (September 2017)
Ceres Hosts an Ice Volcano (January/February 2017: The Year in Science) 
A Dark Milky Way (January/February 2017: The Year in Science)
The Full Picture: The universe's biggest blasts take on a new dimension (July/August 2016)
Hot Answers to a Solar Mystery (January/February 2016: The Year in Science)
Dark Matter Pushback (January/February 2016: The Year in Science)
Saturn's Watery Moon Makes Waves (January/February 2016: The Year in Science)
Ferocious Black Hole Found (January/February 2016: The Year in Science)
To the Depths of Titan (December 2015)
Old Data Yields New Discoveries (December 2015)
A New Tool for Finding Exploding Stars (July/August 2015)
Our Black Hole Skips a Meal (June 2015)
Saturn's Moon Hides Liquid Water (January/February 2015: The Year in Science)
Jupiter's Shrinking Spot (January/February 2015: The Year in Science)
The Moon’s Water Came From Earth (January/February 2014: The Year in Science)
The Tiniest Galaxy in the Universe (January/February 2014: The Year in Science)

D-brief:

How Jupiter and Saturn Formed From Mere Pebbles (August 19, 2015)
Eight Likely Habitable Exoplanets Discovered (January 6, 2015)

 

Drone360

Covert Connectivity (July/August 2016)
Headed in the Right Direction (March/April 2016)

 

New Scientist

Feature:
Have black holes hurled half the universe into the wilderness? (online August 3, 2016; August 6, 2016, print issue)

News:
Record-breaking super bright supernova spotted in southern sky (July 10, 2015)
Supernova prized by astronomers begins to fade from view (June 10, 2015)
Quasar backlighting gives weight to Andromeda galaxy (March 20, 2015)
Jostling photons could give dark matter away (February 19, 2015)
Orion has a giant dust hula hoop around its waist (February 13, 2015)
Fractals seen in throbs of pulsating golden stars (January 28, 2015)
Spotted: First quadruple star image produced by gravity (December 3, 2014)
Galaxies in filaments spaced like pearls on a necklace (November 21, 2014)
Spacecraft seek geysers without human help (October 16, 2014)

 

Physics World

Features:
Occulting the stars (Focus On: Astronomy & Space)
The strongest magnets in the universe (November 2015 print issue)

News:
Physics meeting relocated due to discriminatory law (online August 10, 2016)
NASA grants planetary missions extensions (August 2016 print issue)
NSF announces diversity programme (April 2016 print issue)
Pressure on union to drop ExxonMobil sponsorship (April 2016 print issue)
Third telescope to close atop Mauna Kea (December 2015 print issue)
Work starts on building world's largest digital camera (October 2015 print issue)
Physicist nominated to lead US Department of Energy's Office of Science (September 2015 print issue; online August 13, 2015)
Spain and Chile will host next-generation gamma-ray observatory (September 2015 print issue; online July 21, 2015)
US astronomers call for a new space telescope with a giant 12 m mirror (August 2015 print issue; online July 15, 2015)
Upgraded LIGO will begin hunt for gravitational waves soon (July 2015 print issue; online June 22, 2015)
Go-ahead for protest-hit Thirty Meter Telescope, but with fewer future sites on Mauna Kea (July 2015 print issue; online May 28, 2015)
US falling behind due to 'innovation deficit', study finds (June 2015 print issue)
E-mail triggers row over Hawaii telescope (June 2015 print issue; online May 18, 2015)
Protests halt telescope construction on Hawaiian mountain (May 2015 print issue; online April 20, 2015)
New US philanthropy group picks physicist as boss (April 2015 print issue; online March 20, 2015)

 

Popular Science

Fold a Paper Robot (November 2015 print issue)

 

Quanta Magazine

Hidden Supercluster Could Solve Milky Way Mystery (November 21, 2017)
Searching the Sky for the Wobbles of Gravity (October 22, 2015; Syndicated on Wired.com)
The Case for Complex Dark Matter (August 20, 2015; Syndicated on Wired.com)

 

Smithsonian

After a Century of Searching, We Finally Detected Gravitational Waves (February 11, 2016)

 

Symmetry Magazine

Angela Fava: studying neutrinos around the globe (July 26, 2017)
Art Intimates Physics (April 3, 2017)
Viewing our turbulent universe (December 2, 2016)
A tale of two black holes (September 9, 2016)
The next gamma-ray eye on the sky (December 11, 2015)
After the particles physics degree (December 4, 2015)
Underground plans (July 22, 2015)
DECam's far-out forays (April 30, 2015)
DECam's nearby discoveries (January 22, 2015)

 

Science books for kids

Discover Space Exploration (Lerner, 2017)
Cutting-Edge Science and Technology: Astronomy (January 2016)
Cutting-Edge Science and Technology: Space Exploration (January 2016)

 

Astronomy  (Ask Astro: answers to questions from readers)

If we know the path that both the Milky Way and our solar system have been on, could Hubble not look back on that path and see both at some point in the past? (March 2016)
I read that once every second, somewhere in the universe a massive star ends its life as a supernova. How does that compare to the rate of new star formation? (February 2015)
Does temperature have an upper limit like the lower limit of absolute zero? What’s the highest measured value? (March 2014)
In some photographs of galaxy clusters, why are the arcs of a lensed galaxy blue? (November 2013)
Has dark matter ever been detected in or around the Milky Way Galaxy? (March 2013)
What are the coldest places in the solar system? (February 2013)
Planets, orbits, and comets are somewhat round. Is there an underlying mechanism or physical law? (October 2012)
Why do some stars appear to flash a variety of different colors when you look at them through a telescope? (July 2012)
What do the terms arcminutes (') and arcseconds (") mean? (October 2011)
I read that ultraviolet light is the cause of HII regions, but this light is invisible. So why are these objects the color red? (January 2011)
How is it that galaxies merge and collide but the universe is expanding and everything is moving away from everything else? (March 2010)
Could the nearby star Sirius B explode as a type Ia supernova, like some other white dwarf stars in binary star systems have? (September 2009)
I know Einstein’s famous equation E=mc^2 has to do with energy, but what units are used and what do they mean? (August 2005)